Help for high school’s high achievers

REWARDING SUCCESS: Club Narooma's Graham Reeve, Tony Casu, Paul Naylor and John King flank Narooma High's Chloe Bobbin at the $10,000 bursary announcement.

REWARDING SUCCESS: Club Narooma's Graham Reeve, Tony Casu, Paul Naylor and John King flank Narooma High's Chloe Bobbin at the $10,000 bursary announcement.

High achievers at the Narooma High School can put their hand up for financial assistance, thanks to a $10,000 bursary from Club Narooma.

The Narooma High School acting principal Andrew Thomas said kids could apply for money to help cover travel and accommodation costs when traveling for training or to attend competitions and events.

“We don’t want to focus only sport – although that is where the majority of the money will go,” Mr Thomas said.

“Once you get to the elite level, so much more money is needed just to be able to train, to participate.”

He said athletes like Lily Bennett, representing Australia in Rugby League, and Year 7 snowboarding champion Val Guseli, incurred enormous costs training and performing, were obvious applicants.

“It’s up to them to come and ask but we will keep an eye out too,” Mr Thomas said.

“Not all kids will ask for help and we might give some of them an elbow along.”

Mr Thomas said the school would spread the club’s money back through the whole community – using it for as many kids as they could.

“We have boys going to the state netball; they could apply for assistance with travel – to help pay for the coach or accommodation,” he said.

Mr Thomas said the process would remain the same as when Club Narooma considered individual applications from the school but the bursary allowed the school more flexibility.

“Each applicant will be considered on a variety of parameters: financial disadvantage, the level of the competition, and the distance and time taken for travel,” Mr Thomas said.

Narooma Sporting and Services Club general manager Mr Tony Casu said the club saw the need to help out the parents of high-achieving students.

“This gets kids to Sydney, or wherever they need to go, for a few nights in order to progress,” Mr Casu said.

“It’s about looking after the local community.”