What WIRES does for wildlife…

WIRES (Wildlife Information Rescue & Education Service) Mid-South Coast branch comprises of a team of dedicated volunteers.

During the past summer, many native species have been rescued including a rather sad-looking female green sea turtle (Chelonia mydas).

A member of the public rang to inform WIRES that the turtle was stranded on Rosedale beach and volunteer member Bevan Badcott rescued her from the shallow surf.

She was extremely ill and could not swim, dive or feed correctly.

Strict protocols must be adhered to when marine turtles come into care and all rescues must be reported to National Parks.

This turtle was transferred to a specialist for treatment but unfortunately succumbed to organ failure due to suspected toxins.

Many marine animals succumb to plastic pollution in our oceans and one of the biggest culprits is plastic bags.

Plastic bags in the ocean resemble jelly fish, a favourite turtle food.

Turtles such as this green sea turtle eat plastic bags that clog up their digestive tract and can eventually kill them.

Hundreds of thousands of sea turtles, whales and other marine mammals and more than a million seabirds die each year from ocean pollution, either by ingestion or entanglement.

Locals can help stop this carnage by reducing the use of disposable plastics, taking care that our waste does not end up in waterways or the ocean, and by picking up plastic waste seen on beaches and waterways.

To report injured wildlife contact WIRES on 0427 020 327.

SAD TURTLE: WIRES volunteer Bevan Badcott holds a sad-looking green sea turtle that later died probably due to ingesting plastic.

SAD TURTLE: WIRES volunteer Bevan Badcott holds a sad-looking green sea turtle that later died probably due to ingesting plastic.

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