‘It’s all about country’

IN THE JAR: Barbara Smith had to taste more than 100 jars of jams, jellies and preserves in her role as judge at the 2017 Eurobodalla Show. In 2018, the show society has returned to its roots, putting the word Agricultural back into its title.
IN THE JAR: Barbara Smith had to taste more than 100 jars of jams, jellies and preserves in her role as judge at the 2017 Eurobodalla Show. In 2018, the show society has returned to its roots, putting the word Agricultural back into its title.

There’s a new word on the street for the 2018 Eurobodalla show – or rather an old word will walk tall again.

In 2018, the Eurobodalla District Show will return to its roots and its original name – the Eurobodalla Agricultural Show.

Putting the “agri” back into show culture at the January 27 and 28 Moruya event is part of a statewide trend.

Treasurer Lindsay Boyton said the change responded to public feedback to show societies around NSW – from the Royal Easter Show down.

“We have gone back to the roots of an agricultural show where people can come and display things they have made,” Mr Boyton said.

“We are trying to get the country feel back into the shows; we have got the cattle back, the alpacas back.

You don’t have to be really good. It is neighbour against neighbour

Lindsay Boyton

“Every show in the state is trying to get back to the roots, starting from the Royal.”

Mr Boyton said shows had become too commercial.

“We are trying to get agricultural and family entertainment back into the shows, as well as having the sideshows. We want a more family atmosphere.

“People come back after the show and give your feedback. They tell you what they found good at the show and what they would like.”

Mr Boyton said the pavilion full of jams, jellies, cakes, knitting, needlework and craft remained a mainstay of the show tradition.

“People enjoy looking at all of those things,” he said.

“You don’t have to be really good. It is neighbour against neighbour.”

The Moruya Showground event no longer runs during the day on Friday, but the society is putting on a free live music event that night.

“We are opening the bar from 6-10.30pm,” Mr Boyton said.

He said photography was now one of the biggest exhibitions and while wine entries had declined, more exhibitors were turning their hand to spirits including, one year, a blue “sambuca”.

“You can’t sell it, but you can always make it,” he said.

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