Dalmeny Narooma Bushwalkers report

Reflections of Dry River walkers, from left, Judi deSmeth, Cindy Chipchase, Jen Mathieson, Heather Ferguson, Kerren Ogg, Margaret Lynch, Margaret Moran and Gail Drury.

Reflections of Dry River walkers, from left, Judi deSmeth, Cindy Chipchase, Jen Mathieson, Heather Ferguson, Kerren Ogg, Margaret Lynch, Margaret Moran and Gail Drury.

Thursday, July 4, was a new walk led by Gail Drury, at Quaama Dry River Area. Gail first started by welcoming the eight walkers and gave us some local history. Apparently the Dry River is also known as Murrah/Dry River. Quaama means "Shallow Water".

Gail started the walk via the Anglican Church, a lovely building, the Quaama School of Arts building founded in 1902, the public school which was founded in 1877. The walkers walked along the Dry River bed mostly sandy, to the Cemetery where history and old grave sites were seen.

Making their way along the road at the back of Quaama passing Dexter Cows, horses and dogs, the walkers found a road named Field Bucketts Road which took them down to another part of the Murrah/Dry River, here they explored up the river following animal trails and seeing many wombat holes.

They had a lovely morning tea around huge boulders in the middle of the river, with the odd pool of water and even in some areas flowing water. After the exploring they retraced their steps back to Quaama and had lunch at a delightful spot on the river with a big pool of water and the sun even popped out. Back to the cars where Gail was thanked for the new 10km walk.

On Saturday, July 6, the walkers headed north early to meet walk leader Barry Keeley at Nelligen for a walk around Clyde River National Park, a new walk and Barry's first leading the Dalmeny Narooma Bushwalkers.

After the overnight rain the walkers were looking forward to seeing some evidence of it and were not disappointed seeing drops of water on the leaves of trees as they passed and some puddles on the tracks.

The six walkers walked along well formed hilly trails, passing through Nelligen Cemetery. A little bush bashing thrown in for good measure. It was a lovely winter's day to take in the sounds and sights of the Australian bush.

Walkers beside the Clyde River at lunch time. From left, Narelle Spees, Donna Garten, Cindy Chipchase, Peter Hunt, Barry Keeley.

Walkers beside the Clyde River at lunch time. From left, Narelle Spees, Donna Garten, Cindy Chipchase, Peter Hunt, Barry Keeley.

The group enjoyed a well-earned break for lunch on the banks of the picturesque Clyde River. Following lunch the bushwalkers re-entered the bush for the return journey leading over a creek or two even lucky enough to see a couple of glossy black cockatoos flying overhead. Back at the cars, Barry was thanked for this wonderful walk of 13km, and was asked to lead more in the area.