OPINION

'Mystery fraudster's non-existent twin'

Hindsight is a wonderful thing, but there was always something a little off about the mystery man who reported his twin brother missing on a remote Far South Coast beach last week.

The plot is like something from a feature film. As the search for his twin entered day two, word was he did not want to talk with the media.

As he walked from where the police were stationed to his vehicle, he took a moment to look up and give me a quick nod and a smile.

He was dressed much like many tourists. He got in his car and drove away.

I was going to take a photograph as he walked to the car, but paused, thinking there would be many more opportunities to capture his story. As far as everyone knew, his twin was missing.

I wondered why he was not also out looking for his brother, although he may not have been in the right state of mind.

Something didn't feel right and I shared my thoughts with other journalists. One also mentioned they would be out looking if it were their brother missing.

Due to the nature of the investigation, detectives could not talk. The man sat briefly on the beach watching the frantic search.

From a distance, he looked distraught, with his heads in his hands.

With the power of hindsight it may have all been an act, or the immensity of the lie he was telling was sinking in.

The trope is commonly known as the Fake Twin Gambit, which is often used by superheroes to hide their true identity from the public.

As far as we know, he has also managed to evade police even after allegedly faking his own death.

Little is publicly known about the 42-year-old from Victoria, other than he is facing allegations of fraud in his home state, and is now wanted by both Victoria and NSW Police.

The mystery man on Wednesday told police his twin brother had disappeared after going for a swim at Gillards Beach while he himself was visiting Tathra.

Three days and endless emergency services hours later, police estimated the search efforts as costing upwards of a million dollars.

Alasdair McDonald

Australian Community Media