From British Army to Batemans Bay, project engineer talks bridges | PHOTOS, VIDEO

Did you watch the assembling of the 400t crane on August 30? The sister barges have different sized cranes - 250t and 400t.
Did you watch the assembling of the 400t crane on August 30? The sister barges have different sized cranes - 250t and 400t.

The Batemans Bay bridge replacement project sends staff to the region from the opposite end of the world.

One of the project engineers working at the site, Mark Stevens, is training to be a chartered engineer with the British Army.

"I'm lucky to be in Australia from the UK for nine months doing work on this Batemans Bay bridge project," he said.

"I've been doing an education course for nine months, then they send us out to (the) industry to get some experience."

He said the Batemans Bay project was different in some ways to his military engineering experiences, but the "scale and challenges" were similar.

"As part of our training (as a) royal engineer, we do bridging for the army so if there's a river we need to cross with our vehicles, we put in bridges," he said.

"(They were) fairly small scale - usually under 30 metres.

"But this is a very different project, it's a much bigger bridge and it's a different design aswell, so it's been really interesting to see how it works and how it fits together."

Project barge/marine supervisor Brad Johnstone and John Holland project engineer Mark Stevens talk bridges.

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