Moruya High School students, police, PCYC hit waves with 'Swell' surfing program

MONDAY SURF: Some Moruya High School students start their week with a dip in the ocean and barbecue brekky before they head off to school.
MONDAY SURF: Some Moruya High School students start their week with a dip in the ocean and barbecue brekky before they head off to school.

Monday mornings might not be so bad if the week starts riding the swells of North Broulee Beach, followed by a brekky barbecue.

That is the hope of South Coast Police, PCYC and Surfrider Foundation in delivering a surfing program to Moruya High School students.

If all goes well, organisers could spread the program throughout the Eurobodalla Shire.

Not-for-profit organisation Clontarf Foundation, based at Moruya High School, identified students eligible for the program.

The year 7-9 students were picked up from school, taken to the beach by 8.30am and were taught to surf by Broulee Surf School.

Police men and women swapped their blue stripes for a wettie and surf board, and jumped in too.

Youth Liason Officer Senior Constable Matt Berry said besides the health benefits of sport, the program gave kids a chance for positive contact with police.

"Most of these kids are aged between 12-to-15 years old, so they're at the stage where they need support and guidance," he said.

"The idea is to increase contact and engagement, and get them to understand we're there to help and support them."

He said it was rewarding to see their improvement.

"The smiles you get out there surfing with them ... it's been very rewarding for us," he said.

"The engagement's positive and that's what we want the kids to take away from it."

Eurobodalla Surfrider Foundation founder Allen Grimwood, and surfer Wayne Carberry, of Bodalla, offered their knowledge to the teens.

Mr Grimwood said surfing had the power to help young people develop passions and healthy lifestyles.

"It's almost an art form, really. It's more than a sport. It becomes a life," Mr Grimwood said.

Mr Carberry also taught the teens about bush food.

Through mentoring, he hoped they would improve communication, discipline, and know that opportunities were endless.

He said young people could move mountains if they had a sense of belonging.

"They're able to identify who they are, where they're from, who is family, and know the area inside-out," Mr Carberry said.

"They're going to be the local knowledge they can share to anyone that comes to this place."

Mr Grimwood said the program was funded by Regional Development of Australia - Far South Coast, and Katungal.

READ MORE

Write to the editor

Comments