'Here to save lives': What it's like to be a Marine Rescue radio operator

Lately, radio operators of Narooma Marine Rescue have begun their early morning shift to the sight of a "pea soup fog".

Fog, so foggy they advise boats to sound their horn and switch lights on to avoid collision in and out of the bar.

Gillian Kearney and John Lundy at the Narooma Marine Rescue base.

Gillian Kearney and John Lundy at the Narooma Marine Rescue base.

The view from the radio room changes each day, or dramatically - in seconds.

Radio operators say it's the best spot to watch whales and sea eagles, amazing sunrises and sunsets.

Scenery aside, deputy unit commander John Lundy said the thrill that comes with being a radio operator is what hooks him in.

He joined Marine Rescue almost three years ago after reading an article in Narooma News.

After reading the article, I popped up to the station and they signed me up," he said.

Mr Lundy has a police and military background.

Gillian Kearney and John Lundy of Narooma Marine Rescue value their time volunteering as radio operators.

Gillian Kearney and John Lundy of Narooma Marine Rescue value their time volunteering as radio operators.

"I like the structure and that I am the first point of contact if someone is in trouble - it's a stimulating thing," he said.

The Narooma Bar is considered to be one of the most dangerous on the South Coast.

Marine Rescue radio operators are vital when it comes to saving lives on the water.

"You log boats on and off - you're the dead man's switch for a boat," administration officer and radio operator Gillian Kearney said.

"You're really here to save lives."

Narooma Marine Rescue need more radio operators.

John Lundy took this photograph of a sunrise at the Narooma Marine Rescue Base one morning.

John Lundy took this photograph of a sunrise at the Narooma Marine Rescue Base one morning.

"We're looking for people who can spare the time to do six hour shifts over summer, and five hour shifts in winter," Ms Kearney said.

"Ideally, anyone with a background in military or communications would be suited.

"You receive all the training and mentoring to fulfill the role.

"If you're into the ocean and weather - then you will really enjoy it."

Radio operators carryout weather observations throughout the day and broadcast conditions to the ABC radio each morning.

"Ulladulla and Narooma are the only bases to observe the weather for the Bureau of Meteorology," Mr Lundy said.

John Lundy said the technology is easy to operate.

John Lundy said the technology is easy to operate.

"The technology in the radio room is very easy to learn and use."

If you're interested in becoming a member, visit the Narooma Marine Rescue base to have a chat or call 44761443. The base is manned from 6am-6pm.

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