Tesla cars impress at Narooma Renewable Energy Expo

The two Tesla Model S electric cars that came down from Canberra with their owners impressed at the Narooma Renewable Energy Expo on the weekend. 

Click here for all the photos from the renewable energy expo

Rene Konrad and Warwick Hall both drove down their state-of-the-art electric Tesla sports cars and were keen to spread the virtues of the new technology. It was obvious they were converts.

“You don’t have to ask,” Mr Konrad said. “Everywhere you drive, people smile at you and that makes me smile even more because I am driving it. You cannot not be happy with a Tesla.”

He has owned his bright, cherry red Tesla Model S 85 for 18 months and has calculated he spends as little as $6 to $8 charging it every three days. And while his one of the tamer drive trains, his Model S can still do an eye-watering 225 km/h.

The length of charging depends on the power source, which can range from a normal 10-amp socket all the way to a 180-amp, super-charging station.

Both vehicles are also equipped with self-driving technology but there is still restrictions on where this system can be used, particularly on rural roads.

Instrumental in bringing the two Teslas and their owners down to Narooma was Mark Hemmingsen of Electric Vehicles Canberra, whose business includes building electric vehicle charging stations around Canberra for the ActewAGL power company. 

Mr Hemmingsen said there would be an increasing number of charging stations built around Australia in future years.

In officially opening the expo, Eurobodalla Shire councillor Phil Constable congratulated Narooma Rotary on its “fantastic initiative” of the Renewable Energy Expo and said he was also impressed to see Tesla cars close up.

“I’m excited that a location for a Tesla recharging station is currently being discussed for Narooma,” he said.

Speaking of electric vehicles, Narooma Rotarian Mike Young was at the expo showing off his neighbour's electric-assisted TT Scrambler bicycle. The bicycle was great away to get around town and had even been adapted to carry a surfboard.

But it was not just about vehicles as the new battery technology including from Tesla was on display at the stall of Cameron Rowley of Narooma Electrics. 

Mr Rowley said the batteries were a great way to store power derived from solar panels for use at night and dark days, while it was also made homes and business black-out proof.

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